Why I am not a Christian

Needing to read the Bible for university at the moment naturally brings to mind religion in general and religious people.

I was raised an Atheist. I don’t recall it being militant; it’s just that God and religion weren’t relevant to us. It wasn’t important and as such it was rarely discussed, as far as I recall.

But I do remember – reminded recently by my mother – trying to read the bible as a pre-teen. I sat at our kitchen bench with the huge family Bible (courtesy of my father’s mother), frequently making remarks such as “This doesn’t make sense!” and “But this bit contradicts that other bit!” Mum, as I recall, shook her head and rolled her eyes, implying agreement I think.

And so, this is the first reason I am not a Christian. I wasn’t raised one, and I was allowed to believe that the Bible made no sense.

As part of a conversation with a Christian lady recently, she said something along the lines of, “Of course you don’t believe, you weren’t brought up with it. I pray you find the truth,” which simply begs the rejoinder, “Of course you do believe it, you were brought up with it!” Her statement proved only that one doesn’t usually deviate from one’s upbringing. Such astonishing logic is hardly likely to sway me.

Part of becoming a modern Christian, apparently, is ‘accepting Jesus as your personal saviour’ and entering a ‘personal relationship with Him.’ Even if I wanted to, I wouldn’t have the faintest idea what that means or how one would go about doing it. The only way I can think of is to join a cult; apparently their brainwashing techniques are so effective that even the most cynical can be taken in. However I’d rather avoid that path, as I value what mental health I have left.

And so, this is the second reason I am not a Christian. The process of becoming one appears to involve mental acrobatics closely resembling 1984.

As an adult, the more I read or hear about the religion, the less sense it makes. It’s an instance of more knowledge simply leading to more questions. I’ve read almost all of the Bible multiple times (Old Testament and New Testament, and some of the Apocrypha), I’ve spoken to Christian people, and naturally I’ve seen Christian views portrayed in or by the media. I read Margaret Court’s piece in the Herald Sun the other day, for instance. Nothing that I hear or see makes the idea of Christianity seem any more logical or appealing to me; quite the opposite in fact.

And so, this is the third reason I am not a Christian. I am a rational, intelligent, thinking adult and I have made a rational, intelligent, adult choice.

Viral Mondegreenity

In the last few minutes I have seen two expressions written down which made me wince. Further wince-worthy was the fact that nobody else found it necessary to correct or clarify; these expressions are apparently common!

In the blue corner… “To all intensive purposes.” My own purposes are generally much more relaxed.

And in the red corner… “Judge Judy and executioner.” Now that’s a show I’d watch!

Wine what?

This is a screenshot of an ad I saw on Facebook today. It made me boggle. It also reminded me that I have a ‘Badd Inglish’ category on this blog, and I’m not afraid to use it!

Don’t let my wine what?

Why is that second sentence a question?

Why store my wine anywhere that isn’t my stomach?

I’m so confused.

Does a small head make one modest?

Shortly after Evelyn’s birth, we were told by the hospital paediatrician that she had a small anterior fontantelle. This, apparently, was nothing to be overly worried about, but we should keep an eye on it. Accordingly, it has been checked by her child health  nurse at each appointment.

On Wednesday, at her four-month check-up, the nurse mentioned that the fontanelle is now worryingly small and we need to get an ultrasound to have it checked out.

The anterior fontantelle is one of many soft spots in a baby’s skull which exist to allow the skull to grow and expand. If the spot is too small, the concern is that it may be closing, or ‘fusing’, too early. If that happened, the skull may not grow, and therefore of course the brain could  not grow.

I’ve been assured that the chances of this small fontanelle really being a big problem are really very small. But it does need to be checked, just in case. So I now have a referral from my GP to get an ultrasound, and the results of that will determine our next course of action. I’ll keep you updated!

Where they’re at

Being the beginning of a new year, I thought it appropriate to do a post about my children and their current states of development. This is something I hope they will look back on in years to come!

Elspeth, two and a half years old

  • Loves to wear purple dresses
  • Still obsessed with Winnie the Pooh
  • Cheeky and playful, tries to play tricks on people
  • Very good vocabulary and sentence structure
  • Starting to make up words for fun
  • Recognises a few written words like ‘Ellie’ and ‘Mummy’ and ‘Daddy’
  • Loves books and stories
  • Excellent imagination, which comes through in her games
  • Going through a bit of a boundary-testing, tantrum-throwing stage
  • Fussy with food, won’t eat a lot of things
  • Favourite food is vegemite sandwiches
  • Still not potty trained
  • Runs around singing songs, including making up songs; some tunes are recognisable even when she uses different words
  • In the new year (very soon) I want to get Elspeth toilet trained, eating real foods, and sleeping without a dummy

Evelyn, three months old

  • Capable of rolling over (but forgets how sometimes)
  • Lots of smiles and laughs, especially first thing in the morning
  • Sleeps well, but not all night yet
  • Babbles, very chatty
  • Can’t quite sit up, but is making the effort
  • When she wants something, her shriek is ear-piercing
  • In the new year (very soon) I’d like Evelyn to be rolling over regularly and beginning to eat some solids