Things Evelyn says

evie tummyEvelyn is getting more of a grasp on language now, and says many understandable things. She’s really good at ‘bubble’ and ‘bread’, and ‘wa-wer’ consistently means ‘shower’. We get ‘more, more,’ whenever she wants, well, more of something. She makes a sort of ‘jooossss’ noise which clearly means ‘juice’. She makes, upon request, the correct noises for a variety of animals, including dog, cat, elephant, snake, monkey, sheep, and cow. She says ‘eye’ while poking me in it. There are plenty more, but those are her best and clearest sounds. She’s becoming quite the chatterbox!

Further conversations with Elspeth

ImageMore quotes and conversations.

 

January 22, 2013:
Elspeth: Mum, I made a mud pie!
Me: Ok, who’s going to eat it?
Elspeth: Nobody, it’s made out of mud! But the mud is made out of playdoh.
January 17, 2013:
Elspeth is making up a song, and part of it goes, ‘How good is my voice? Do you like my voice? I think my voice is a very good voice!’
January 13, 2013:
Ellie’s holding a piece of sandwich and carrying on a conversation with herself in two different voices.
Voice one: I’m hungry.
Voice two: I’m full.
Voice one: I’m still hungry.
Voice two: But I’m really really full!
… and it went on like that.
January 11, 2013:
Aidan (watching cricket): That was a monster of a 6.
Ellie: What monster, I can’t see one, where is he?
January 8, 2013:
Elspeth just hid something for me to find, and when I said, ‘Hmmm, where could it be…’ she ran to it, pointed at it, and said ‘It could be here!’
January 3, 2013:
Me: Oh, Elspeth, you’ve got orange texta all over your pretty dress!
Elspeth: I’m making it MORE pretty!
January 1, 2013:
I was building towers for Evie, and Ellie came along and took some. ‘I’m stealing your blocks! It’s a lovely day for block stealing. Now I have a nice block collection.’

The circuit

I took the girls to the playground across the road this morning. Well, it’s across the road, we go there a bit. As recently as yesterday, Evelyn hesitated to climb the steps. But this morning she was racing up them, running across the wobbly bridge, and half-falling down the slide with reckless abandon! As I recall, Elspeth was about three months older than this when she started doing that circuit, so I guess Evelyn has benefitted from having an older sibling to watch and learn from!

Chatterbub

evie tentEvelyn’s vocalisations are becoming increasingly complex. She still doesn’t make any sense, but she sounds like she should! She just said to me something that sounded like ‘Boyd Attaway!’ and I was like, ‘Ok, who’s that?’ She replied, ‘Feed the boy!’ Long babble-sentences are becoming very common.

Nonsense babble, of course, but she can say a couple of words reasonably clearly. She was saying ‘cat’ a lot yesterday, because we were in a house with one. She also managed ‘bus’ a few times, as they passed us. She is currently playing with the buttons on my pyjama top, going ‘Bwa-bay! Bwaaaaa-boo!’, which I’m going to interpret as attempts at ‘button’.

She’s also using body language more effectively. For quite some time she’s been shaking her head emphatically to indicate ‘no’, and she’s recently started nodding for ‘yes’ as well. She will also grab my hands and put them where she wants them; she’s been trying to pull them off the keyboard and put them into a hug around her while I’m typing this!

One way and another, she is very adept at communicating; there is rarely any doubt as to what she wants!

Say cheese!

For quite a while now, of course, Evelyn has been making a wide variety of sounds. She uses ‘ma ma’ to mean me, and ‘da da’ to mean Aidan. We can tell when she wants something, when she’s hurt, and so on, from the sound she makes. But until two days ago, she really hadn’t applied many real words deliberately to real objects. (Mostly just ‘woof’, but that seems to apply to lots of animals, not just dogs!)

And then she said ‘cheese!’ It was sort of more like ‘zeez’ at first, but her pronunciation got better the more she tried. And she was pointing at the cheese at the time.

She’s also showing increased comprehension; she seems to understand most of what is said to her, even if she can’t respond in kind. She can point to various parts of her body when asked, and she responds enthusiastcally to the mention of foods she likes.